Introduction
Wellington Harbour

Our port:now and in
the future

Wellington Harbour / Te Whanganui a Tara and its waterfront are the beating heart of Wellington city, providing a unique setting for our vibrant culture, and delighting locals and visitors alike.

CentrePort, is part of Wellington’s harbour, and is a vital connection for the freight and transport system of central New Zealand. We bring trade, people and economic value to the region.

Our inland strategy connects central North Island businesses to the port through our CentreRail network in partnership with KiwiRail.

CentrePort is committed to our role in the shared guardianship of the Wellington Harbour. We want to ensure our business is sustainable as we look towards the future of the city and the port’s Regeneration.

Styled map of central New Zealand

CentrePort, is part of Wellington’s harbour, and is a vital connection for the freight and transport system of central New Zealand. We bring trade, people and economic value to the region.

Our inland strategy connects central North Island businesses to the port through our CentreRail network in partnership with KiwiRail.

CentrePort is committed to our role in the shared guardianship of the Wellington Harbour. We want to ensure our business is sustainable as we look towards the future of the city and the port’s Regeneration.

Regeneration Pillars

Our goal is to regenerate CentrePort and deliver a 21st century logistics asset which will deliver the best for our people, our customers, our community, and our environment.

Our Regeneration will further enable us to deliver on our business objectives:

  • To build a long term sustainable and resilient business
  • To grow freight capacity
  • To optimise land use and enable urban integration
  • To strengthen relationships.
Regeneration pillars: our customers, our community, our environment, our people

Our goal is to regenerate CentrePort and deliver a 21st century logistics asset which will deliver the best for our people, our customers, our community, and our environment.

Our Regeneration will further enable us to deliver on our business objectives:

  • To build a long term sustainable and resilient business
  • To grow freight capacity
  • To optimise land use and enable urban integration
  • To strengthen relationships.
Future possibilities

Future possibilities

The possible scenarios below will allow Wellingtonians and visitors alike to have more urban integration and enjoy more of the waterfront, as well as optimising efficiencies and building a long-term, sustainable business for CentrePort.

High-level satellite image of CentrePort’s Wellington current operations, showing the Kaiwharawhara waste minimisation operations, the current Interislander ferry terminal at Kaiwharawhara, North gate, the reinstated container berth, expanded container and log sliding, main gate, CentrePort house at Shed 39, improved port entrance and exit, and Bluebridge ferry operations.
High-level satellite image of CentrePort’s possible medium-term layout. It shows the proposed multi-user ferry terminal location at Kaiwharawhara, improved commercial main port layout and greater urban integration along Waterloo Quay heading towards the city centre in the Inner Harbour precinct.
This image is a birds-eye-view of Kaiwharawhara, displaying the proposed location of the multi-user ferry terminal. The image includes a mock-up of where the Bluebridge and Interislander ferries would be berthed at the port, as well as room for a back-up berth. It also shows lines of where the ferry terminal entry from the urban motorway, terminal exit flyover, and new rail line.
This image shows an overview of CentrePort’s current operational area, but with improved layout for increased efficiencies and volumes of cargo. Yellow dots on the map show current and possible future cargo volumes. 2019 volume for vehicles was 26,000, and an upgraded potential maximum volume would be 70,000. 2019 volume for logs was 1.7 million, and an upgraded potential maximum volume would be 4 million. 2019 containers volume was 94,000, and potential maximum capacity would be 400,000.
This image shows the south west of the port, heading towards the railway station and Parliament grounds. It is a more connected area between the port and the city. Current land used by the port on existing wharfs would be freed up for new builds or public space. The builds could be a range of things, but are not defined in this mock-up. The map also shows a new resilient floating cruise berth and cruise terminal, which would be closer to the city and railway station, however the inner harbour project is not dependent on cruise.

Future possibilities

The possible scenarios below will allow Wellingtonians and visitors alike to have more urban integration and enjoy more of the waterfront, as well as optimising efficiencies and building a long-term, sustainable business for CentrePort.

High-level satellite image of CentrePort’s Wellington current operations, showing the Kaiwharawhara waste minimisation operations, the current Interislander ferry terminal at Kaiwharawhara, North gate, the reinstated container berth, expanded container and log sliding, main gate, CentrePort house at Shed 39, improved port entrance and exit, and Bluebridge ferry operations.
High-level satellite image of CentrePort’s possible medium-term layout. It shows the proposed multi-user ferry terminal location at Kaiwharawhara, improved commercial main port layout and greater urban integration along Waterloo Quay heading towards the city centre in the Inner Harbour precinct.
This image is a birds-eye-view of Kaiwharawhara, displaying the proposed location of the multi-user ferry terminal. The image includes a mock-up of where the Bluebridge and Interislander ferries would be berthed at the port, as well as room for a back-up berth. It also shows lines of where the ferry terminal entry from the urban motorway, terminal exit flyover, and new rail line.
This image shows an overview of CentrePort’s current operational area, but with improved layout for increased efficiencies and volumes of cargo. Yellow dots on the map show current and possible future cargo volumes. 2019 volume for vehicles was 26,000, and an upgraded potential maximum volume would be 70,000. 2019 volume for logs was 1.7 million, and an upgraded potential maximum volume would be 4 million. 2019 containers volume was 94,000, and potential maximum capacity would be 400,000.
This image shows the south west of the port, heading towards the railway station and Parliament grounds. It is a more connected area between the port and the city. Current land used by the port on existing wharfs would be freed up for new builds or public space. The builds could be a range of things, but are not defined in this mock-up. The map also shows a new resilient floating cruise berth and cruise terminal, which would be closer to the city and railway station, however the inner harbour project is not dependent on cruise.

The benefits

contribute more than
$3 billionto regional GDP by 2022

support for up to
36,000 jobs

The benefits

Any future scenario must support our port operations and the interests of the wider city and community.

Wellington city has the opportunity for greater urban integration with the port. Our operations also offer access to freight, support for up to 36,000 jobs, and the potential contribution of more than $3 billion to regional GDP by 2022.

As estimated in CentrePort Economic Impact Scenario Projection to 2020, BERL.

Interim phases
Interim phase map 1

Interim phase

Other scenarios include if the multi-user ferry terminal at Kaiwharawhara does not go ahead, and Strait NZ Bluebridge remains using its existing ferry terminal.

This would not prevent CentrePort from proceeding with inner-harbour connectivity works to better integrate the port with Wellington city, however there would be less room for new builds on the existing land, which would continue to be used for port operations.

Seaview works
Seaview port

Seaview works

CentrePort’s Seaview Wharf is a critical asset and a vital piece of the fuel supply chain for the lower North Island.

Seaview is a key component of the Lifelines asset network in the event of an emergency.

As part of the port’s ongoing Regeneration, work will continue to ensure the Wharf is resilient and fit-for-purpose in the long-term.

Let’s keep the conversation going.

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Centreport.Communications@centreport.co.nz